Comments

  1. EEEk! I forgot the 1 tsp of salt! Sorry everyone!

  2. This pizza crust is wonderful!!

  3. I’m not sure how you would use it to make stromboli if you have to bake it before adding ingredients. Can you advise me?
    I look forward to trying this version of pizza dough, and being able to have some on hand should we need more than what my bread machine can make for an evening. :)
    Also, is it possible to freeze the dough prior to baking?

    • Hi Robin! This was a submitted recipe and is on our list to be tested, but it’s still a few recipes down. Having worked with other AFB pizza dough, my guess is that this shouldn’t be a problem if you fill it with ingredients and then fold it over or roll it and seal it. The other pizza doughs are freezable, so this one should be too though I’d be watch the thickness of the crust to make sure it has a chance to cook through before the ingredients start to brown/burn. Keep us posted with what you end up doing, and feel free to take a picture to add to the Image Gallery, too.

  4. Hey Robin!
    For Stromboli, you just roll out the dough into your pan, fill with your ingredients and bake for 30 min at 350 depending on your ingredients. No need to prebake the crust. I make the kind with hamburger, pepperoni, turkey, ham, and mozzarella. As Darien said, you just have to watch your dough thickness to make sure it gets baked thoroughly. =)

    • I will add that these directions are for making pizza, but you can use the raw dough to make just about anything else that would require pizza dough.

  5. thanks for the help. I’ve made stromboli before, always using premade dough. so I know you’re not supposed to bake it before filling it. good to know the time and heat for baking after filling. thanks again.

    my new, big question, can you freeze this dough before cooking it, and if so, should it be before or after it rises, so that I can make it ahead to have on hand for a stromboli night?

    today I’ve got a batch of chocolate bread baking, and tons of starter (first round with commercial yeast; very productive), and I plan to make a couple batches of pizza crusts with some of the rest. :) If I can freeze pre-risen dough, that would really help. meanwhile, I think I will have to freeze or refrigerate some starter…I’m out of sugar! :)

  6. reply to myself. I plan to make the pizza dough, load it for stromboli, wrap and freeze. on “stromboli/pizza” day, I will take it out in the morning to defrost for 7-8 hours, and bake in time for supper. I will let you know how it turns out.

    How forgiving is the rising time? I presume all day or overnight means approximately 8 hours? is 9-10 still going to work? thanks in advance.

    • Hey Robin! As far as I know you could probably freeze either before or after rising. If you are freezing a dough ball for pizza, I’d do it before the rise. If you are going to freeze it in crust form, I form the crust and pre-bake it for 5-10 minutes then freeze. That works awesome for me!

      I make all of my stromboli up ahead of time and then freeze it. Depending on your ingredients, I’ve even popped it into the oven fully frozen and it has come out beautifully!

      Yep, rise time is eight hours. I think 9-10 would still work since you wouldn’t be going for a second rise. Since you won’t need the culture to sustain itself through a second rise, then a longer rise time shouldn’t affect it at all. =)

  7. Thank you, Jennifer! I asked, in part b/c, if I set the dough to rise in the evening, it will likely be easily 10 hours before I get back to it, thanks to morning schedules with children. But letting it rise overnight, and getting to the rest of the dough in the morning, when I have more energy, sounds appealing. Now, I have 3 starters on the counter (I ended up with about 6.5 to 6.75–I had to toss the extra–from this first batch) ready for some attention. I’ve never tried pre-making stromboli before, and I really like the idea of having that on hand!

    • No problem Robin! Glad to help! I am a junkie for having meals made up ahead of time that I can just get out of the freezer either in the morning to thaw, or right before I need to throw it in the oven. With young children, its a MUST! =)

  8. I left my dough on the stove warmer all day and it didn’t budge. Not sure what I did wrong, but I couldn’t get this dough to rise or have any elasticity.

    • Hi Michelle!

      Its possible the stove warmer could have been way too warm. I know my stove warmer gets warm enough to kill a culture pretty quickly.

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